Shutter speed priority mode explained

Shutter speed priority mode

In this article we are going to talk about Shutter Speed priority mode of your camera.

You can set this by selecting the Tv mode on your camera

Shutter speed is the duration of the exposure, from the opening of the shutter to the closing. It is measured in seconds.An average, you can allow the shutter to be opened from 30 seconds to 1/1000 of a second. For longer exposures than this you need to set up the camera in BULB mode – subject to a different article

By setting camera on shutter speed priority, you will allow your camera to decide on the aperture and ISO to use. By fixing the ISO as well, only the aperture will become a variable and your camera will decide which one to use depending on the lighting conditions. This is a good setting to use when you need to freedom not to worry about the settings when the lighting conditions change fast.

Try to learn how to control this setting by setting your shutter speed to 1/125th of a second, and the ISO to 100. Test your camera with few shots. If the lighting levels are below or above reasonable levels, your camera will let you know, by not allowing you to take the shot or flicking your settings display to get your attention something is wrong. In this situation you can modify the ISO if the level of light is too low and try again. If necessary you can increase the ISO to as high as possible in order to obtain the good exposure

If there is too much light (on a beach in sunny conditions for example) that means is time to set up the camera on a faster shutter speed 1/250 – 1/500 or even faster)

 Shutter speed priority mode is the best selection to freeze action

In the image below it is necessary to have a fast shutter speed such as 1:250 of a second. the more light is available the faster you can go and the sharper image you will get

shutter speed priority mode

I would just like to mention the fact that this is my favourite setting to use due to following factors:

–       Slower shutter speed than 1/125th of a second will create a blurry picture. This is the general rule of thumb and I always shoot faster than this

–       Even in low light conditions I prefer to use this shutter speed and increase the ISO up to 800. Higher ISO do not look that bad in Black and White as the grain is being faded

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About Christian Tudor

professional photographer, main editor at Academy of Photography and owner and principal photographer of Tudor Photography